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LandLAB

LANDLAB IS A STUDIO BASED PRACTICE COLLABORATING TO ACHIEVE SUSTAINABLE, INNOVATIVE AND CREATIVE OUTCOMES ACROSS A RANGE OF LANDSCAPE, URBANISM AND PLACE MAKING PROJECTS IN AUCKLAND, CHRISTCHURCH, TAURANGA AND WELLINGTON.

We believe in a place based, design-led process. We guide projects with expertise, leadership and tenacity. We collaborate with our clients, communities, technical consultants and other creative disciplines. We encourage authenticity, innovation, and environmental responsibility. We design for people and are equally interested in how each project works, is assembled and looks. We believe that good design is good business… and good fun.
We operate at the intersection of ecology, landscape architecture and urbanism. Our expertise extends across landscape led urban design, landscape architecture, ecology and place making. We have specific and acknowledged expertise in the design of urban environments and complex landscapes across a range of project types and scales. Our work reflects an ongoing interrogation of the inter-relationships between the ecologies and systems of ‘LANDSCAPE’, ‘URBANISM’ and ‘PLACE’.
Our project experience includes the design leadership of city centre precincts, urban campuses, residential masterplans, river edge and waterfront sites, transport infrastructure, place and activation strategies and the detailed design of streets, shared spaces, public open spaces and innovative green infrastructure.
LandLAB was established in 2013. We are based in Auckland New Zealand but work nationally in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch as well as smaller regional centres such as Tauranga, Gisborne and Whanganui. We have 8 staff ranging from recent graduates to senior landscape architects and urban designers.
We enjoy close working relationships with a network of ecologist, industrial designers, artists, planners and social entrepeneurs. We are collaborators and are currently working on a number of projects with landscape architectural peers and allied design disciplines.
We are committed to sustainable and low impact design. We have piloted the use of the Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia (ISCA) design ratings tool in New Zealand and our office has recently achieved a CarbonZero certification.

RECENT ACHIEVEMENTS

Achieved New Zealands first Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia (ISCA) rated public realm project certification for the $20m Madden and Pakenham Street transformation in Auckland’s Wynyard Quarter
Te Ara I Whiti – Lightpath was recently shortlisted for a 2016 World Architecture Festival (WAF) Award
Invited and attended American Landscape Architecture Foundation (LAF) 50 year anniversary conference in Philladelphia, USA
Director Henry Crothers received a Denizen Heroes Award for contribution to Aucklands City Centre and Waterfront public realm
Our Westhaven Promenade, Daldy Street Linear Park and Light Path projects were voted as the 3 Best of Auckland projects by Auckland Council for 2015
Selected in phaidon’s 30:30 Contemporary Landscape Architecture publication which includes “30 of today’s most forward-thinking and 30 of the world’s most celebrated landscape architects.” (Phaidon, November 2015)

DATA

Team: Henry Crothers, Sam Gould, Scott Greenhalgh, Monique Hawkins, Cory Manson, Ethan Reid, Jamie Stronge, Zac Thorp, Luke Veldhuizen
Studio Space: 127.4 sq.m
IT Power: 27.5 GHZ
Espresso: Allpress
Cycles: Schindelhauer Viktor
Drinks: Hallertau Luxe
Plays: 5 aside football (‘Field Operations’)

SKY TERRACE

An exemplary urban rooftop landscape which connects the historic process of reclaiming a city from the ocean, with the contemporary process of raising the city to the sky

A conceptual geological bluff or terrace sits across the roof of a city centre retail block at the edge of the Waitemata. The design concept is informed by the interaction of coastal edge ecologies (fluid) and the reclaimed city morphology (grid).

A generative design strategy has been used to inform shape, topography and arrangement of elements and capturing the dynamic interface and working systems of the former coastal edge zone and a range of episodic experiences within a cohesive whole.

The rooftop is conceived as a hybrid space combining three spaces in one – the main plaza and garden (east) and social (west) rooms flanking the main tower.

The ground plane establishes a singular connective surface in an abstract ‘graphic field’ derived from the underlying waterfront hydrology. The garden is conceived as an authentic ecology, reintroducing rare and endangered native vegetation into the urban realm.

The carefully articulated interface between plaza and garden a system of micro environments providing nested opportunities for occupation. The bespoke furniture recalls the crafted timber forms of both indigenous and post settlement boat building technologies.

A combination of hard (surfaces, architectural frames) and soft (moveable furniture, lighting and technology) enables a flexible and adaptable space able to be appropriated for a range of events and activities that support a contemporary work place.

Hard and soft infrastructures enable a range of curated experiences and operational modes that enable Sky Terrace to provide a constantly evolving range of experiences.

Client_ Precinct Properties
Location_ Auckland, New Zealand
Budget_ $2.5m
Team_ Henry Crothers, Scott Greenhalgh, Ethan Reid, Sam Gould

DALDY STREET LINEAR PARK

Daldy Street Linear Park establishes a new strategic city connection, between former and existing waters edges. Its alignment traces an historical stream through a reclaimed waterfront site previously occupied by the petro-chemical industry.

The park runs 600m through 4 city blocks and establishing a new connection between the industrial heart of the Quarter and the waters edge.

The functionality and linearity of a shared surface street is merged with the rhythmical spatial sequencing of a park into a hybrid space. Enabling services, stormwater infrastructure and new walking, cycling and public transport (buses and trams) provide for the future development and occupation of the waterfront.

The park spaces provide a constructed topography – referencing the underlying intertidal zone – merging retained industrial platforms, circulation and overland flow. The materiality and design language is informed by the former marine and industrial activity. Circular seating forms in both concrete and steel reference the presence and absence of the tanks which previously occupied the site.

Found objects and recycled materials have been retained and appropriated into park features. A series of tank elements combine re-purposed tanks and recycled materials to create distributed programs of play, culture and environmental function – including storm water harvesting for re-use within the park.

The project has achieved the international best practice rating from an independent sustainability review. Phase 2 of the project is scheduled for completion in 2017.

Client_ Panuku Development Auckland
Location_ Wynyard Quarter, Auckland, New Zealand
Budget_ $25.0m (Phase One)
Team_ Henry Crothers, Scott Greenhalgh, Ethan Reid, Sam Gould
Collaborators_ Architectus, OPUS

SOUTH FRAME PUBLIC REALM

THE VISION FOR THE THE SOUTH FRAME PUBLIC REALM IS TO CATALYSE ‘AN AUTHENTIC, CONTEMPORARY AND UNIQUELY URBAN PRECINCT WHICH USES CREATIVITY, INNOVATION, LANDSCAPE, URBANISM AND SUSTAINABLE DESIGN TO REVEAL ITS PAST, PROVIDE A CATALYST FOR ITS FUTURE AND SEED A CREATIVE COMMUNITY’.

The proposed new public realm network has been strategically inserted into an existing urban environment decimated by the 2011 Christchurch earthquakes. The proposal comprises of three key strategic interventions. These are;

‘The Greenway’ –  an urban garden which weaves together ecology, site archaeology and social infrastructure into a multi-layered, and episodic ‘journey’ through the site. A new organising and connecting ‘spine’ which enables the environmental, economic and social regeneration of the Precinct

‘The Lanes’ – a new lane-way system which acknowledges the past whilst enabling the future. North-south connections and destinations deliver accessibility, connectivity and fine grained activity

‘The Yards’ – a network of landscape destinations that enable social, cultural and economic vitality. Supported by a site specific strategic activation and place making strategy the Yards are places for connection, engagement and expression revealing the identity and spirit of the Precinct.

The project has embedded green infrastructure and Ngati Paoa cultural and landscape values through the use of low impact design strategies, low embodied energy materials and the integration and re-use of found objects and site materials to minimize its ecological footprint.

Client_ Otakaro Ltd.
Location_ Christchurch, New Zealand
Budget_ $NA
Team_ Henry Crothers, Scott Greenhalgh, Ethan Reid, Sam Gould
Collaborators_ AECOM, JASMAX

TE ARA I WHITI LIGHT PATH

Introduction

Te Ara I Whiti – Lightpath transforms a redundant piece of motorway infrastructure into a sculptural and playful cycle path threaded through Auckland’s inner city motorway network.

Design Intent

The intent of the project was to create a hybrid space that supports its intended function as a cycle path but also enables and encourages exploration, discovery and occupation. The path enables a journey and episodic experience that engages the tough infrastructural context of the adjacent motorway as well as contextual views of the wider urban landscape. At the urban scale the pathway is conceived as a unifying and connecting form by day and a dynamic living sculpture by night. Light Path is both an experience and a place.

Surface
The cambered deck traces the sites former topography and is treated as a continuous and connecting urban surface extending 700m in length. The graphic and bold treatment of the surface enables it to be read as singular urban scaled intervention that sits comfortably within the mega scale of the surrounding motorway network. Folded steel benches emerge from this ground plane to provide moments of occupation. The hot pink colour scheme provides a deliberate but abstract reference to the sites natural history, a nod to the adjacent night life district of Karanghape Road as well as tactical whimsy.

Lighting

Three hundred individual LED light poles controlled by sensors are arranged as a spine down the city side of the path creating a living and breathing interactive urban light sculpture that responds to varying patterns and intensities of user movement. This flexible technical infrastructure enables the opportunity for a curated, constantly evolving lighting program.

Te Ara I Whiti is a maori name which translates to ‘path of light’.

Client_ Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, NZTA
Location_ Auckland, New Zealand
Budget_ $5m
Team_ Henry Crothers, Scott Greenhalgh, Jamie Stronge
Collaborators_ Monk Mackenzie Architects, GHD, Iion

WYNYARD COMMONS

Wynyard Commons will establish a new heart at the geographical centre of the Wynyard Quarter – Auckland’s emerging mixed use waterfront precinct.

The space extends across and claims adjacent streets to establish a singular and connecting urban surface between new layered and framing edges, to manage vehicle behavior and speed and to collect and direct movements through the space.

A constructed topography – generated from the sites former harbour geology – is adopted to integrate recreational spaces, social infrastructure, low impact design and green infrastructure within a unified park topography.

The site captures and treats 90% of run-off from adjacent streets and sites exceeding required design standards. Its designed topography enables the park to provide attenuation for significant storm events. An innovative mud-creteing process stablises underlying contamination and minimises material disposed of off site. Found objects and existing concrete hardstands are either repurposed or recycled into the design. The project forms part of a suite of Wynyard projects – also designed by LandLAB – that have piloted the Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia (ISCA) rating tool in New Zealand.

A 100% native coastal planting palette supports green infrastructure and biodiversity and includes a rare native, medicinal and productive garden zones.

A pavilion form accommodates a subterranean substation and public facilities and establishes a structure which can be appropriated for a supporting program of strategic activation and events.

Client_ Panuku Development Auckland
Location_ Auckland, New Zealand
Budget_ $5.0m
Team_ Henry Crothers, Scott Greenhalgh, Ethan Reid, Sam Gould
Collaborators_ JACOBS, E3BW

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